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New Android App Helps Hearing Impaired

Using a mobile phone can be quite challenging for someone who is hearing impaired, so what would be a good idea is if mobile phone calls came with subtitles so those with hearing difficulties could read what was being said.

Well according to an article over on Slash Gear and by way of Android Community, there’s a new application available on the Android Market called Hamilton Mobile CapTel which enables the hard of hearing to read and hear what is being said by way of a headset.

The new Android application is also compatible with Droid devices, and with this new app coming to Android the Hamilton Mobile CapTel app is now available on Android, the iPhone and also BlackBerry smartphones.

The app enables the user to receive real-time conversation captioning and specific Android handsets that support this new application include the Samsung Epic 4G, HTC Aria and Motorola Backflip along with those Droid handsets.

Comments

2 thoughts on “New Android App Helps Hearing Impaired”

  1. Reply
    SKV says:

    Quick clarification—the Hamilton CapTel Android captioned telephone service currently works through a Web browser. The app is coming soon so stay tuned! Read more about Hamilton CapTel's Android solution here http://bit.ly/c17Dh1

  2. Reply
    Deaf Deaf says:

    Hearing Impaired

    Please be advised that the term, “hearing impaired” is unacceptable. Here is the explanation:

    The term "Hearing Impaired" is a technically accurate term much preferred by hearing people, largely because they view it as politically correct. In the mainstream society, to boldly state one's disability (e.g., deaf, blind, etc.) is somewhat rude and impolite. To their way of thinking, it is far better to soften the harsh reality by using the word "impaired" along with "visual", "hearing", and so on. "hearing-impaired" is a well-meaning word that is much-resented by deaf and hard of hearing people.

    While it's true that their hearing is not perfect, that doesn't make them impaired as people. Most would prefer to be called Deaf, Hard of Hearing or deaf when the need arises to refer to their hearing status, but not as a primary way to identify them as people (where their hearing status is not significant).

    Hope that you and your people respect by refusing to use the outdated and offensive term.

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