Galaxy Nexus, Droid RAZR two-part comparison video

Over in the USA they are still waiting the arrival of the first Android Ice Cream Sandwich packing Samsung Galaxy Nexus, and if you are growing weary perhaps you are contemplating picking up the Motorola Droid RAZR rather than continuing to wait for the Galaxy Nexus, but can’t make up your mind, well perhaps a comparison video between the two will help you make that important decision.

Thus we have a Samsung Galaxy Nexus verses the Motorola Droid RAZR comparison fight video for your viewing consideration below that comes our way courtesy of Aaron Baker over at Phone Dog and comprises of two videos, when combined they deliver a nice twenty-four minutes of checking out both Android smartphones.

The comparison pits the GSM version of the Galaxy Nexus against the Droid RAZR as the Verizon 4G LTE model still isn’t available but there is some compassion to be had as both devices sport a 1.2GHz TI OMAP dual core processor and large touch screen, the Galaxy Nexus having a 4.65-inch Super AMOLED HD 720p display with PenTile tech and the Droid RAZR having a 4.3-inch Super AMOLED Advanced display with PenTile tech.

Camera wise the Samsung Galaxy Nexus falls behind the RAZR slightly by sporting a 5 megapixel rear facing camera with 1080p video, as to the Droid RAZR having an 8 megapixel rear facing camera with 1080p video. Whereas the Galaxy Nexus wins when it comes to operating system sporting Android 4.0 while the Droid RAZR packs Android 2.3.5 Gingerbread.

But which device can come out on top? Well I wont spoil your viewing enjoyment but rather just let you head on down to hit that play button and check out this two-part video comparison fight for yourself…enjoy.

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Comments

14 thoughts on “Galaxy Nexus, Droid RAZR two-part comparison video”

  1. Reply
    Rusty Shackleford says:

    This might not be exciting but I got to hold the real Galaxy Nexus yesterday. I walked in and was greeted by a nice lady and told her I wanted the nexus in hopes of getting lucky. She said it wasn’t out yet then I replied, “but it is in the store right?” she smiled and said yes we have the demo in back. She talked to the manager and they then lead me to the back room where I was greeted with the galaxy nexus as well as the new droid tablet that isn’t out yet. The nexus wasn’t activated verizon must have put some sort of lock on some of the demos because i tried to activate it. I did however get to hold it and turn it on to see the brilliant animation. The colors were crazy beautiful. I then grabbed the droid tab and it was super fast and the screen was awesome. The 4G was so fast. I still can’t believe they let me back there. What are ever bodies thoughts? They also said they were hoping monday but aren’t thinking it will be right.

  2. Reply
    Anon says:

    They look incredibly similar, but the build quality of the Droid Razr looks awesome. Once it gets ICS it will be the best phone. This has helped me make up my mind.. thanks!

  3. Reply
    Don305 says:

    Verizon has way too many Razrs stuck in the warehouse that they can’t sell. Thats why there’s a delay on the Nexus. A fool and his money is soon parted.

    1. Reply
      Bill Kilpatrick says:

      Conventional wisdom has it that the Razr is a disappointingly inferior phone but this side-by-side up-ends that wisdom while mindlessly repeating it.

      The Razr was thinner.  It had a better camera.  It beat the Nexus in the speed test (although that test was admittedly flawed).  Its user interface was actually easier to use.  It had a better battery life.  It’s lighter.  It’s more durable (with Kevlar and Gorilla Glass).  Its shape (with contours at 45-degree angles) is even more original than the flattened-out iPhone-copying shape of the Nexus.  

      On paper, the Nexus has bragging rights for three reasons: (1) ICS; (2) a bigger screen; and (3) a better screen, due to its superior pixel rate.  These are the features that are supposed to outweigh (pardon the pun) the Razr’s advantages: (1) thinner profile; (2) lighter weight; (3) greater durability; (4) faster speed; (5) better camera; and (6) smoother orientation transitions.

      But ICS didn’t do it – at least not in these videos.  It allowed customized widgets but not necessarily an easier-to-use interface.  The Razr was judged to be more user-friendly in this regard, despite the coolness factor in having the only Android running on ICS.  Given that Razr is at the top of the list of current headsets slated to be updated to ICS, it’s an advantage that would matter more if it simply could.  Unfortunately, this pair of videos still leaves that point hanging.

      In the meantime, the “bigger” and “better” screen of the Nexus is left somewhat neutralized.  Before watching these two videos, I was more willing to accept those claims at face value.  It’s basic math – 4.65 is a larger number than 4.3 – and yet, when those two phones are placed side by side, there isn’t an obvious difference in screen size.  This is because the additional .35″ of real estate, on the Nexus, is devoted to replicating the Razr’s buttons.  Watching a video in landscape mode, the difference may be more noticeable.  Even in portrait mode, there’s a slight difference of width (enough to manage an additional character on each line) but I guess I was expecting something a big more dramatic than this slightest of enhancements.

      As for the differences to be had from pixel rate, any such differences are hardly to be found in this pair of videos.  There are sites, featuring blown-up side-by-side comparisons of the Razr and the Nexus, as well as the Rezound, but this pair of videos shows what most of us would likely see: two Super AMOLED displays.  To the naked eye, the screens on these two phones looked identical in quality.

      Does that mean that people should buy the Razr over the Nexus?  Not necessarily.  The Nexus still has its Trinity of bragging rights – ICS, the larger screen and the better pixel rate.  But these advantages have to be weighed against the Razr’s advantages: a slimmer design, a lighter weight, better durability, a better camera and an easier-to-use interface.  What’s more, this video actually shows the Razr outrunning the Nexus, even if the test was flawed to begin with.  

      The “verdict” as to which phone is better must be a qualified one, at best.  Those looking to customize, or quicker updates from Google, or at least the bragging rights of the slightly larger screen with a better pixel rate, will want the Nexus.  Those looking to simply walk around with the coolness of having the only phone running off of ICS will want it for that reason alone.  But given all of the Razr’s advantages – from speed to durability to sporting a better camera or an easier-to-use interface – the Nexus is not the clear “winner” at all.

      Like the song says, “They give you this but you pay for that.”

      1. Reply
        Skier18336 says:

        I purchased the Razr fiesta and returned it due to the awful battery life. I am very excited about the better screen and pixels of the Galaxy Nexus plus I was able to upgrade to an even larger battery. While I was in front on the Verizon store I was on a 30 minute phone call and the battery of the Razr went down to 60%. Way to much to pay for the thinnest phone plus it is so square that it is not comfortable to hold in hand and I am 6’3″ with large hands. The Galaxy Nexus is the clear winner.
        I had to issues out of the box with the Nexus. The google voice dialed did not work and I had to download
        Ad

        1. Reply
          Skier18636 says:

          Sorry for the previous typos. I replaced the voice dialed with Vlingo and visual voicemail did not work either so I replaced it with Visual Voice Mail Nexus and the Galaxy Nexus is running great.

          1. Skier18636 says:

            PS the Nexus is not perfect, it would be great if it had an external memory card like the Razr.

  4. Reply
    Bill Kilpatrick says:

    You’re a wh*re.  I’m not saying that to be mean.  I’m not saying it to be vulgar.  I’m saying it because you gave the higher rating to the Galaxy Nexus when the Droid was actually faster, has the greater durability of Gorilla Glass and Kevlar, made smoother orientation transitions, had a better speaker and a clearly better camera.  While the Galaxy Nexus claims a larger display, the difference was negligible where noticeable at all, the “true HD display” showed no noticeable improvement in picture quality and the advantages of ICS or Gingerbread were underwhelming.  Given that the Razr is one of the first handsets scheduled for an ICS upgrade in early 2012, while the camera on the Nexus is never going to be better than it is, a little integrity would have led you to go with the math rather than the hype.  If ICS is so much better than Gingerbread, you failed to show it.  If the Nexus is faster than the Razr, you failed to show it (though, to be fair, you couldn’t off of HSPA).  If the Nexus display has it all over that of the Razr, or is even noticeably larger, you again failed to show it.  All you showed us was that these phones are very similar, with slight advantages on each side.  As the Razr can be had for less, it’s clearly the better value.

  5. Reply
    Anonymous says:

    People need to quit stressing cameras in phones. Yes you have it with you all the time, but if your going to take a lot of pictures, get a real camera, and megapixels aren’t everything, all they do is take up more space on your phone, as does 1080p video. Neither device has a 1080p screen and nobody is going to use these phones for cinematography, so what is the point?

    1. Reply
      Bill Kilpatrick says:

      My point is not that you shouldn’t buy a Galaxy Nexus because of its 5 mp camera.  The original Droid had a 5 mp camera which was fine for most purposes.  For less than $100, you can pick up a camera with 16 mp; for less than $200, you can get one with a decent lens.  Professional cameras range, in resolution, from 16 to 24 mp, making the flap over 5 and 8 mp trivial.

      What annoys me is a side-by-side comparison of the Nexus and the Razr where the Razr scoops the Nexus enough times to at least elicit a draw, if not an outright nod – not an end-of-two-video banner announcing that the Nexus “won” the battle without getting off many shots. 

      The Razr was thinner.
      It had a better camera.
      It was faster.
      Its orientation transition was better.
      It came with Gorilla Glass and Kevlar.
      Its version of Gingerbread was more user-friendly than ICS.

      To give the Nexus its due, it has a bigger screen and a better pixel rate than the Razr.
      But placed side by side, it’s hard to see the difference in screen size.
      The Nexus’s 4.65″ screen includes virtual versions of buttons the Razr has.
      In landscape mode, it’s a difference of .35″ – measured corner to corner.
      Otherwise, there’s no noticeable difference.
      Where those buttons appear, the viewing screens are the same size.

      That brings us down to the pixel rate, which doesn’t show a difference in the video.
      It’s possible that there’s a wondrous difference in person.
      But the video doesn’t even comment upon such a difference.
      Both phones have wonderful Super AMOLED screens.
      But if the Nexus’s pixel-rate produces an obvious difference, where’s the commentary?

      It’s possible that the Nexus is a better camera.
      I HOPE it is.  The Nexus is the newest release.

      But if the Nexus had won some “battle” of the phones, it wasn’t shown here.

      A side-by-side comparison that doesn’t show a winner, but declares one, isn’t worth two videos.  It’s insulting.  It’s not an act of journalism.  It’s just a sales pitch.

      It’s the informational equivalent of a laff track or an APPLAUSE sign.

    2. Reply
      Bill Kilpatrick says:

      My point is not that you shouldn’t buy a Galaxy Nexus because of its 5 mp camera.  The original Droid had a 5 mp camera which was fine for most purposes.  For less than $100, you can pick up a camera with 16 mp; for less than $200, you can get one with a decent lens.  Professional cameras range, in resolution, from 16 to 24 mp, making the flap over 5 and 8 mp trivial.

      What annoys me is a side-by-side comparison of the Nexus and the Razr where the Razr scoops the Nexus enough times to at least elicit a draw, if not an outright nod – not an end-of-two-video banner announcing that the Nexus “won” the battle without getting off many shots. 

      The Razr was thinner.
      It had a better camera.
      It was faster.
      Its orientation transition was better.
      It came with Gorilla Glass and Kevlar.
      Its version of Gingerbread was more user-friendly than ICS.

      To give the Nexus its due, it has a bigger screen and a better pixel rate than the Razr.
      But placed side by side, it’s hard to see the difference in screen size.
      The Nexus’s 4.65″ screen includes virtual versions of buttons the Razr has.
      In landscape mode, it’s a difference of .35″ – measured corner to corner.
      Otherwise, there’s no noticeable difference.
      Where those buttons appear, the viewing screens are the same size.

      That brings us down to the pixel rate, which doesn’t show a difference in the video.
      It’s possible that there’s a wondrous difference in person.
      But the video doesn’t even comment upon such a difference.
      Both phones have wonderful Super AMOLED screens.
      But if the Nexus’s pixel-rate produces an obvious difference, where’s the commentary?

      It’s possible that the Nexus is a better camera.
      I HOPE it is.  The Nexus is the newest release.

      But if the Nexus had won some “battle” of the phones, it wasn’t shown here.

      A side-by-side comparison that doesn’t show a winner, but declares one, isn’t worth two videos.  It’s insulting.  It’s not an act of journalism.  It’s just a sales pitch.

      It’s the informational equivalent of a laff track or an APPLAUSE sign.

  6. Reply
    Anonymous says:

    Not to be the only one on my block without the Galaxy Nexus, I brought my Razr back and exchanged it for the GN. No lie, the Nexus is an outstanding phone, just wonderful in so many respects, including a slight improvement in screen width and extension vertically to ad screen where the haptic buttons were. On the other hand, it’s not faster than the Razr nor does the screen, for.all its added pixels seem better than the lush Super.AMOLED of the Razr. The big plus is ICS, which is a lot of fun to explore. As both phones are now the same price, it’s a no-brainer to choose the Nexus. But if you have purchased the Razr and are just kicking yourself, don’t. It’s thinner, has a better camera, has Gorilla Glass and comes packing Kevlar. I just loved my Razr and my admiration.for it has not diminished now that I have the Nexus. If you are waiting for ICS just be patient. The Razr will sport it soon.

  7. Reply
    Craig says:

    if razr gets ice cream update lets say in may 2012 and they now both have ice cream WHO  IS  DOGFIGHT  WINNER  THEN ???

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