Samsung Galaxy Note 2 forecasts for US release dates

The Samsung Galaxy Note 2 (Note II) smartphone is one of the most avidly awaited smartphones of the year, at least in the U.S. that is. Fortunate consumers in some other regions such as the U.K have already seen the release of the Galaxy Note 2 and once again this has left potential US customers gnashing at the bit to get hold of it. Today we want to look at forecasts for the US release dates of the Galaxy Note 2 on various carriers including Verizon and AT&T.

It’s not the first time that US consumers have had to wait longer for a new Samsung device than those in the UK or other countries as exactly the same thing happened with the Galaxy S3 and the original Galaxy Note as well as other products so you can imagine that plenty of people in the US could feel rather frustrated at this. Although one carrier, AT&T, has officially announced it will be carrying the Galaxy Note 2 the only release information forthcoming was that it would be available ‘later this year.’

However we do know that variants of the Galaxy Note 2 have passed though the FCC for different US carriers which is usually a good sign of a release sooner rather than later. There are other clues for predicting release timeframes too. For instance another thing we know is that an event likely to be for the launch of the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 in the US is scheduled to take place in New York on October 24. We would expect to hear release details for US carriers at this event and as everybody already knows all the details of the actual phone as it has already launched elsewhere, this event is likely to be to drum up publicity for an imminent release. After all what would be the point of a big hurrah for the phone if a release wasn’t coming until weeks later.

Over on Gotta Be Mobile, expectations for US release dates for the Galaxy Note 2 are also discussed and they point out that the Galaxy Note 2 will be launched on all four major carriers, AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile as well as U.S. Cellular. Going back to the Galaxy S3 (S III), the release in the US again came several months after the release elsewhere but of all the carriers to launch it stateside, US Cellular was one of the last. Apparently US Cellular has already confirmed that it will be releasing the Galaxy Note 2 in October. As the event is only one week before on the 24th there’s only a week left until the end of the month. Therefore if US Cellular is one of the last again, it looks highly likely that it will launch on the other carriers very shortly after the unveiling, maybe on that date itself.

Also if the Galaxy Note 2 follows the same launch pattern of the Galaxy S3, the multiple US carriers had their own launch plans with independent release dates. If this is the case this time around we could see releases follow on a number of consecutive days after the event on the 24th. Another thing to consider is that even if the Galaxy Note 2 doesn’t release within the few days after the event, it’s still likely to come early in November as nobody will want to miss out on the lucrative holiday season.

One thing we do know is that there is likely to be a huge demand for the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 when it does finally hit shelves in the US. There has been a huge amount of interest in this smartphone and of course the original Galaxy Note was a massive success. We also know from readers’ comments to our many posts on the Galaxy Note 2 that there’s a lot of anticipation and excitement building up for its US release and of course we shall bring you further developments on this as we hear them.

Meanwhile we’d like to hear your thoughts on the Galaxy Note 2 for the US. Are you one of the many eagerly waiting for this phone? Are you frustrated that once again US consumers have to wait longer, or maybe you’re not too bothered as long as you get your hands on it soon? Send your comments to let us know.

Comments

18 thoughts on “Samsung Galaxy Note 2 forecasts for US release dates”

  1. Reply
    Notie says:

    i want the Note2! first one to comment so can you give me one for free? LOL and I think it’s very unfair that North America have to be one of the last to get it. Why Europe first? 🙁

  2. Reply
    TooMuchRum says:

    You would think it would hit the US 1st or at least at the same time as the UK. US has 312 million people! UK, only 63 million. If I were Samsung, I’d want to make available my product to the biggest customer base!

    1. Reply
      EtoileBrilliant says:

      Like Samsung owe the US anything after 12 crooked jurors determined that a phone with rounded corners was a $2 billion copyright infringement.

      1. Reply
        toomuchrum says:

        I don’t think Samsung owes the USA anything. It’s just good business. If you want to sell 100 apples, would your first stop be in a town with 5 people or 50 people! I wasn’t trying to invoke anything else.

        1. Reply
          EtoileBrilliant says:

          Sorry “toomuchroom” I wasn’t jumping down your throat, but I couldn’t resist raising the point when I saw your comment. Anyway I was wrong, it was only a round billion.

      2. No the copyright was on a bounce back UI implementation and lumped inti a group of similarities in the UI. It was bull but apple has a lot of lawyers. But I agree with your point that they owe us nothing. Accept for our bit king millions of there devices in the past 3 years and making them the money

    2. Its called a test group. If you release a device that hasn’t had proper testing to 65 million people and fix any problems it has, then you have a success. But if you release it to 3000 million people and it has minor flaws then fixing 3000 million devices is not so easy. You will have alot more negativity from 300mil then from 60 mil then release a more tested device to your larger markets.

  3. is it true that the us version of the galaxy note 2 will come in a different shape/design instead of the international version. i read this somewhere. please correct me if im wrong

  4. I haven’t been this excited over a phone since ….. well .. never! I cant wait!
    & Samsung is not an American product so why would they launch in America first? Greedy Americans want everything first! Lol

  5. Reply
    Bishee says:

    I have had my Galaxy Note II for a week now. All I can say is that don’t be impatient and get a new iPhone. It’s not worth it. This Galaxy Note is many magnitudes better and such a brilliant improvement on the iPhone. It IS well worth the wait!

    1. Reply
      Kay says:

      I got the new iphone 5 sent it back and got note 2 your so write. Iphone 5 a let down love the note 2 and I dont think its too big actually love it x

  6. Reply
    Joe the plummer :-) says:

    I truly beleive the iphone is a better quality phone. Void of the excessive samsung bloatware and spyware issues. That said i also use an android and will anjoy playing and testing with this phone.

  7. Reply
    jimmy trott says:

    i wat it right now i do not want to wait a all for it i just want to know when can pre orde t through at&tbecause ill be damed if i get t te localAT&T toe to find out thery have been sold out

  8. Reply
    Wait for it.... says:

    Since the Note 2 launched less than 2 years after the first I’m concerned about signing a 2 year contract for a phone that will be obsolete in a year or less. Does this bug anyone else? The new iPhone really isn’t much of an improvement over the last and it has horrible map app issues. Looks like they rushed it to market too fast. I don’t want that to happen to a phone I’d really like to get. I’m concerned that the carrier I buy it from will limit it’s connectivity so I can’t take it to other carriers when I get fed up with lousy service or reception. Just concerned about the consumer getting ripped off more than carrier release dates. I’d really like to buy one outright and go from there. Would the international version be best suited for this? I see comments about how badly people want to get their hands on one but I worry because I’ve been ripped off before.

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